A Primrose, a Pea, and Snakes!

April 27, 2015 | Greg Dodge

Pink evening primrose, or pink ladies, are just coming into bloom in Explore the Wild. There are two patches of these attractive flowers within fifty feet of one another in Explore the Wild, one on either side of the vending area.

 

Primrose starting to bloom now (4/26/15(.

Primrose starting to bloom now (4/26/15).

 

Partridge pea, a plant that I try to cultivate in Catch the Wind here at the Museum has started to sprout. The seed leaves broke the surface last week and are starting to show the beginnings of their pinnately compound leaves.

James (landscape-facilities) was kind enough to cut back the honeysuckle and other plants that had taken hold at the partridge pea site. Partridge pea starts later than the other plants and can be overrun by them. The cut will give them a head start.

Partridge pea attracts sulphur butterflies, which lay their eggs on the plant. The caterpillars that hatch from the eggs eat the leaves and flowers.

 

The site of the partridge pea after cutting.

The site of the partridge pea after cutting.

 

A few days later seedling appeared.

A few days later, seedlings appeared.

 

Fresh young seedlings.

Fresh young seedlings.

 

By August there should be numerous yellow flowers.

By August, if not before, there should be numerous yellow flowers.

 

It’s mating season for the water snakes here in our Wetlands. Many slender male water snakes have been seen searching out the larger females, some finding what they seek.

 

Northern water snakes engaged in procreation. There are three snakes, two males, one female.

Northern water snakes engaged in procreation. There are three snakes, two males, one female.

 

On a chilly morning last week I spotted one of our females feeling out the air before venturing out into the swamp.

 

Checking the temperature before committing to the day.

Checking the temperature before committing to the day.

 

A closer look.

A closer look.

 

 

The snake above, was peeking out of a hole at the roots of a dawn redwood in the Wetlands.

 

 

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